What do Parkinson’s, diabetes and heart disease have in common?

High blood sugar. High triglycerides and LDLs (“bad” fats). High blood pressure.

Metabolic syndrome is the name given to this constellation of health problems. Just like a constellation, these symptoms often appear together and form a picture, but it’s not a pretty one.

Put them all together, add in some extra fat around the middle, and you’ve got a recipe for diabetes and heart disease.

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Why High Functioning Autism Is Hard to Define

High-functioning autism (HFA) is neither an official diagnosis nor is there an agreed-upon definition of what the term means. In the broadest sense of the term, high-functioning autism may mean any of the following:

  • A person with relatively mild symptoms which, despite their mildness, are significant enough to merit an autism spectrum diagnosis.
  • A person with autism whose IQ is higher than 70
  • A person with autism who is successfully navigating a typical school or work environment
  • A person who is able to mask symptoms of autism successfully so they have in expected ways and can “pass” for neurotypical

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How My Adult Autism Diagnosis Led to Self-Acceptance

Sitting in the psychologist’s office was proving to be more difficult than I had expected. This was the fourth “session” I had been through with him, but today, the unmistakable static sound emanating from his noise machine resembled something similar to a chainsaw. This was a new feature piece to the office, or at least the first time I was sharing space with the device while it was turned on. “At least the fluorescent lights were off,” I silently told myself.

I was there to complete my evaluation for autism spectrum disorder and receive the results from the four hours of testing, not including the additional interviewing that had occurred during the same day’s meeting. It would be appropriate to say I was anxiously pensive.

 

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Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms

The symptoms of borderline personality disorder include: a recurring pattern of instability in relationships, efforts to avoid abandonment, identity disturbance, impulsivity, emotional instability, and chronic feelings of emptiness, among other symptoms.

The main feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a significant pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, self-image, and emotions. People with borderline personality disorder can be very impulsive and may demonstrate self-injurious behaviors (e.g., risky sexual behaviors, cutting, or suicide attempts).

Borderline personality disorder occurs in most people by early adulthood (early 20s). A person with this condition will have experienced an unstable pattern of interacting with others for years. This pattern of behavior is usually closely related to the person’s self-image and early social interactions with friends and family. The behavior pattern is present in a variety of settings (e.g., not just at work or home) and often is accompanied by a similar lability (fluctuating back and forth, sometimes in a quick manner) of a person’s emotions and feelings.

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9 Top Symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder

There are nine criteria to be diagnosed with borderline personality disorder — and I want to explain them as someone who has experienced them in an “internal” sense. A lot of these do not apply to me anymore due to my hard work with recovery, but I sometimes struggle with a couple of them.

1. Frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment.

Sometimes I would have frantic thoughts about how I’m going to handle, manipulate and control certain situations that have not happened yet. During an episode, I can get myself worked up with facts and detailed research about situations that have not happened, making myself extremely upset.

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How to Emotionally Hurt A Narcissist, The Way They Hurt You

If you want to hurt someone, you have to first know what they care about and what they’re afraid of. When you know what someone cares about, you can threaten to have it taken away. When you know what they’re afraid of, you can threaten to expose them to it.

So, what do Narcissists fear?

  1. Abandonment
  2. Exposure/ Having their carefully crafted reputation and false reality brought to light/Having the world know who and what they truly are/The truth
  3. Having their character smeared
  4. Being forgotten
  5. Loneliness
  6. Introspection

What do they care about?

  1. Having supply, people to admire them and give them attention
  2. Control
  3. Being important/special in some way
  4. The appearance of success
  5. The opinions of others

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How A Narcissist Looks At Life And You

‘I will control your mind and free-will so that you start to think that you no longer have a mind of your own.”

(In a nutshell from a narcissist’s point of view)

When you first become entangled with me, you will always belong to me.  You become mine, my property, to do with as I see fit.  Your opinions, hopes, and dreams are immaterial to me.  You need to stop thinking of yourself and put my needs above all else.  Give me all your time, attention and admiration or there will be hell to pay.  Your hell, not mine.

In the beginning, you were the center of my world.  Soon I will be the center of yours.

You will learn to accept my version of the truth.  I will never be responsible when things go wrong, and believe me, they will.  It’s inevitable.  Don’t expect me to ever accept blame.  It will never be my fault.  I don’t make mistakes.  Instead, I will shift the blame on to you each and every time.

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17 Best Action Steps to Improve Parkinson’s Disease

17  Best Steps to Improve Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease is the second most common degenerative disorder of the central nervous system after Alzheimer’s disease.  It is estimated that 1% of individuals over the age of 65 are diagnosed with this disorder (1, 2).   In this article, you will discover 17 action steps to improve Parkinson’s disease naturally.

This once rare disease has seen enormous growth over the last 30 years.  In 2005, there were an estimated 4.1 million people worldwide with Parkinson’s disease. In 25 years, that number is predicted to climb to 8.7 million.  As a country we spend over 23 billion dollars each year on Parkinson’s treatments

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21 Songs That Have Helped People on the Autism Spectrum Cope With Sensory Overload

Sensory overload happens when too much sensory stimulus is occurring at once — it can be triggered by a crowded room, a TV turned up too loud, strong aromas, fluorescent lighting and much more. It’s often associated with certain diagnoses like autism, sensory processing disorder, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia and post-traumatic stress disorder, although anyone can experience it.

Music is not always a reliever to sensory overload — in fact, sometimes it can make it worse, so you should ask your loved one on the spectrum if playing a song helps or hurts. But for a lot of people with autism, music works wonders when they are trying to calm themselves down. We asked our readers on the spectrum who use music as a tool to share what songs they play if they’re experiencing sensory overload or melting down. We’ve dropped a Spotify playlist at the bottom of this post if you’d like these songs in one place.

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Letter From a Narcissist’s “True Self”

Here is a hypothetical letter was written from the point of view of a narcissist’s True (lost) Self.

The advice given here by the True Self is almost the polar opposite of whatever their False Self would tell you. That’s because their False Self is a lie and isn’t who they really are, even though they may have been wearing this mask for so long they can never access their True Self without enormous difficulty or even at all.

Always follow the advice of their True Self, no matter how much they protest and rage unless you want further abuse. It’s actually the best thing for them if they ever decide to look in the mirror past the lies they show the world (and may have come to believe is the truth)–and of course, it’s best for you.

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